Why Does E=mc²? (And Why Should We Care?)

Why Does E=mc²? (And Why Should We Care?)

The most accessible, entertaining, and enlightening explanation of the best-known physics equation in the world, as rendered by two of today’s leading scientists.

Professor Brian Cox and Professor Jeff Forshaw go on a journey to the frontier of 21st century science to consider the real meaning behind the iconic sequence of symbols that make up Einstein’s most famous equation, E=mc2. Breaking down the symbols themselves, they pose a series of questions: What is energy? What is mass? What has the speed of light got to do with energy and mass? In answering these questions, they take us to the site of one of the largest scientific experiments ever conducted. Lying beneath the city of Geneva, straddling the Franco-Swiss boarder, is a 27 km particle accelerator, known as the Large Hadron Collider. Using this gigantic machine—which can recreate conditions in the early Universe fractions of a second after the Big Bang—Cox and Forshaw will describe the current theory behind the origin of mass.

Alongside questions of energy and mass, they will consider the third, and perhaps, most intriguing element of the equation: 'c' - or the speed of light. Why is it that the speed of light is the exchange rate? Answering this question is at the heart of the investigation as the authors demonstrate how, in order to truly understand why E=mc2, we first must understand why we must move forward in time and not backwards and how objects in our 3-dimensional world actually move in 4-dimensional space-time. In other words, how the very fabric of our world is constructed. A collaboration between two of the youngest professors in the UK, Why Does E=mc2? promises to be one of the most exciting and accessible explanations of the theory of relativity in recent years.

Title:Why Does E=mc²? (And Why Should We Care?)
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780306817588
Format Type:

    Why Does E=mc²? (And Why Should We Care?) Reviews

  • Courtney Johnston

    I loved this book, and it wasn't just that cheeky Brian Cox going on all the time about being covered in tweed and chalkdust (somebody please hand me a fan).'Why does E=mc2' is my fifth book from the ...

  • Max

    Cox and Forshaw pack Einsteins theories of relativity and much more into 250 pages. They state upfront that their book is intended to be challenging. And it is, despite simplistic analogies and explan...

  • Danielle

    I was expecting, from the first few paragraphs of the book, that I was going to breeze right through this. It didn't really happen that way. I had to take college physics, which included the basics of...

  • C

    Absolutely senseless. If he ever gets close to talking about the matter at hand, another long passage about a motorcyclist will pop up to "explain things"Look. The reason you use so many horrible anal...

  • Kristin

    On a good day, high school physics class used to leave me feeling kind of (for lack of a better word) high. This book brought back that old, familiar feeling, but in an even better way. In the end, I ...

  • Claudia

    Have you watched Wonders Of The Universe with Brian Cox? You should. And afterwards, when youll read this book, his voice and passion will accompany you all along. For me it wasnt a breakthrough e...

  • David Drent

    I would love to say that I understood every word and every example of this book, but unfortunately there were many times I felt like the concepts were far too complicated for me. I'm not an unintellig...

  • Trevor

    Ive got rather mixed feelings about this one. I think writing a simple account of very difficult material is hard to achieve and so every such effort should be praised wherever it is found but there ...

  • Bob Nichols

    For those trying to nudge themselves into Einstein's world a little more, this book's title has great appeal. At some very general level, the equivalence of energy and mass can be understood, but the ...

  • Merilee

    Superb review of latest in particle physics and spacetime. Cox explains things as clearly as possible, but I believe I will need to reread this before I could begin to explain any of it to anyone else...